Amir and assef relationship

amir and assef relationship

They had a huge impact on Amir's relationship with Hassan. Assef shaped Amir's attitude towards Hassan, even if it was an underlying sense of. This lesson will examine the relationship between Amir and Sohrab in Khaled In Chapter 22, Amir has a showdown with Assef that culminates in a fight to. Assef is a sociopath. He derives pleasure from hurting and humiliating other people. The day Assef rapes Hassan because of Amir's.

Baba does have a few fatherly moments though, where he speaks honestly to his son, teaching Amir about his own views on life. And that is theft. When you cheat, you steal the right to fairness… There is no act more wretched than stealing!

The Relationship Between Father and Son in "The Kite Runner"

This neglect and lack of fatherly interest created the problem prevalent throughout the entire story. Just as in the work Oedipus Rex, Baba creates a self-fulfilling prophecy when raising Amir.

In Oedipus Rex, Oedipus took actions to avoid his fate, which inevitably led to the fulfillment of the fate he was attempting to avoid. In Oedipus took actions to avoid his fate, which inevitably led to the fulfillment of the fate he was attempting to avoid. This ultimately creates the sense of jealousy and cowardice within Amir that ends up stopping him from saving Hassan from being raped.

At the kite fighting tournament, Amir cuts down the second place kite and Hassan, his best friend and servant, runs it for him. Hassan finds the kite but gets trapped in an alley with a sadistic bully. Do you think Amir can be held responsible for his actions as a child, despite his upbringing?

He can be held responsible, but not completely. Baba created Amir as a jealous coward; therefore Baba is to blame for the actions Amir took in jealousy and as a coward. Where the blame lies can be shown when one considers another work, Frankenstein. In Frankenstein, the doctor creates a monster, but fails to give him a conscience. Frankenstein cannot be held accountable for the horrific actions he took because that was just how he was created.

The creator is the one to be blamed. A toaster cannot stream movies just as a TV cannot cook dinner. They can only do what they were created to do. Amir was created by Baba to be a jealous, petty coward, therefore Amir cannot be held accountable for the actions he took as a child. To conclude, The Kite Runner illustrates the necessity of having an empathetic fatherly figure, by showing how a child struggles for a father-son bond, and the consequences that can arise due to the actions taken to achieve this relationship.

The relationship between Hassan and his son Sohrab, demonstrates the necessity of an empathetic father, because it shows life where a relationship between father and son can develop.

The Kite Runner scene: Amir and Assef fight.

Hassan listens to his son, plays with him, enjoys spending time with him, and really understands him. In specific relation to these two father-son relationships, Hassan is a foil to Baba while Sohrab is a foil to Amir. Hassan and Baba are both proud, strong men who stand up for what is good and right in the world. After his adoption, Sohrab refuses to interact with Amir or Soraya until the former reminisces about Hassan and kites and shows off some of Hassan's tricks.

In the end, Sohrab only gives a lopsided smile, but Amir takes it with all his heart as he runs the kite for Sohrab, saying, "For you, a thousand times over. Khaled Hosseini acknowledged that the character is "an unlikable coward who failed to come to the aid of his best friend" for much of the duration of the story; consequently, Hosseini chose to create sympathy for Amir through circumstances rather than the personality he was given until the last third of the book. As a child, he enjoys storytelling and is encouraged by Rahim Khan to become a well known writer.

At age 18, he and his father flee to America following the Soviet Military invasion of Afghanistan, where he pursues his dream of being a writer. Hassan is Amir's closest childhood friend. He is described as having a China doll face, green eyes, and a harelip. Hosseini regards him as a flat character in terms of development; he is "a lovely guy and you root for him and you love him but he's not complicated".

Moreover, it would make Hassan a Pashtun according to tribal law and not Hazara as he's actually the son of Baba, and ironic for Assef to bully him as both Assef and Hassan are half Pashtuns. Hassan is later killed by the Taliban for refusal to abandon Amir's property. Assef is the son of a Pashtun father and a German mother, and believes that Pashtuns are superior to Hazaras, although he himself is not a full Pashtun.

As a teenager, he is a neighborhood bully and is enamored with Hitler and Nazism.

The Kite Runner - Wikipedia

He is described as a " sociopath " by Amir. He rapes Hassan to get revenge on Amir. As an adult, he joins the Taliban and sexually abuses Hassan's son, Sohrab and other children of Sohrab's orphanage. Baba is Amir's father and a wealthy businessman who aids the community by creating businesses for others and building a new orphanage.

He is the biological father of Hassan, a fact he hides from both of his children, and seems to favor him over Amir. Similar to Hosseini's father, [11] Baba does not endorse the religiosity demanded by the clerics in the religion classes attended by Amir in school.

In his later years, after fleeing to America, he works at a gas station. He dies from cancer inshortly after Amir and Soraya's wedding. Ali is Baba's servant, a Hazara believed to be Hassan's father. In his youth, Baba's father adopted him after his parents were killed by a drunk driver. Before the events of the novel, Ali had been struck with polio, rendering his right leg useless.

Because of this, Ali is constantly tormented by children in the town. He is later killed by a land mine in Hazarajat. Rahim Khan is Baba's loyal friend and business partner, as well as a mentor to Amir. Rahim persuades Amir to come to Pakistan to inform him that Hassan is his half brother and that he should rescue Sohrab. Soraya is a young Afghan woman whom Amir meets and marries in the United States. Hosseini originally scripted the character as an American woman, but he later agreed to rewrite her as an Afghan immigrant after his editor did not find her background believable for her role in the story.

Before meeting Amir, she ran away with an Afghan boyfriend in Virginia, which, according to Afghan tradition, made her unsuitable for marriage.

Because Amir is unwilling to confront his own past actions, he admires Soraya for her courage in admitting to and moving beyond her past mistakes, and marries her. Sohrab is the son of Hassan. After his parents are killed and he is sent to an orphanage, Assef buys and abuses the child.

The Relationship Between Father and Son in "The Kite Runner" | Owlcation

Amir saves and later adopts him. After being brought to the United States, he slowly adapts to his new life.

amir and assef relationship

Sohrab greatly resembles a young version of his father Hassan. Sanaubar is Ali's wife and the mother of Hassan. Shortly after Hassan's birth, she runs away from home and joins a group of traveling dancers. She later returns to Hassan in his adulthood. To make up for her neglect, she provides a grandmother figure for Sohrab, Hassan's son. Farid is a taxi driver who is initially abrasive toward Amir, but later befriends him.

Two of Farid's seven children were killed by a land mine, a disaster which mutilated three fingers on his left hand and also took some of his toes. After spending a night with Farid's brother's impoverished family, Amir hides a bundle of money under the mattress to help them.

Themes[ edit ] Because its themes of friendship, betrayal, guilt, redemption and the uneasy love between fathers and sons are universal, and not specifically Afghan, the book has been able to reach across cultural, racial, religious and gender gaps to resonate with readers of varying backgrounds. Even after leaving the country, moving to America, marrying, and becoming a successful writer, he is unable to forget the incident.

amir and assef relationship

Hassan is "the all-sacrificing Christ-figure, the one who, even in death, calls Amir to redemption". Both [The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns] are multigenerational, and so the relationship between parent and child, with all of its manifest complexities and contradictions, is a prominent theme.

I did not intend this, but I am keenly interested, it appears, in the way parents and children love, disappoint, and in the end honor each other. In one way, the two novels are corollaries: Erika Milvy from Salon praised it as "beautifully written, startling and heart wrenching".

Much of it based in a world we don't know, a world we're barely beginning to know. Well-written, published at the 'right time' by an author who is both charming and thoughtful in his personal appearances for the book. It's about human beings. It's about redemption, and redemption is a powerful theme. Hosseini's depiction of pre-revolutionary Afghanistan is rich in warmth and humor but also tense with the friction between the nation's different ethnic groups.

Amir's father, or Baba, personifies all that is reckless, courageous and arrogant in his dominant Pashtun tribe The novel's canvas turns dark when Hosseini describes the suffering of his country under the tyranny of the Taliban, whom Amir encounters when he finally returns home, hoping to help Hassan and his family.

The final third of the book is full of haunting images: People experience their lives against the backdrop of their culture, and while Hosseini wisely steers clear of merely exoticizing Afghanistan as a monolithically foreign place, he does so much work to make his novel emotionally accessible to the American reader that there is almost no room, in the end, for us to consider for long what might differentiate Afghans and Americans.

She felt that Hosseini was too focused on fully redeeming the protagonist in Part III and in doing so created too many unrealistic coincidences that allowed Amir the opportunity to undo his past wrongs. Examples of this would be: Assef's pedophiliaNazismdrug abuseand sadismand the fact that he is an executioner.

Their beef is, 'Why do you have to talk about these things and embarrass us?